Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Can you stay on your horse?

Jane Austin was a writer during the Georgian era and wrote several books, most of which portrayed the clergy in a demeaning way. The clergy were always simpletons and prideful; seemingly turning down their noses at people, rather than ministering the grace of God and His loving kindness.

When my family and I watched a new rendition of Emma by the British BBC. The acting and photography were excellent!

In the first part of the series, the Vicar (clergy) was getting on a horse and someone said about him, “That man is so full of himself, it is a wonder he can stay on his horse!”

This is exactly the opposite description of what should be said about a pastor or even a Christian.

Instead, a person should be able to say, “That man [woman] is such a wonderful person. He is so kind, gracious, humble and easy to get along. He is always reaching out to others, serving them, taking the back seat (or even giving up his seat) so that others can be cared for; he is the last one to be served and the first one to graciously give a kind word of encouragement and minister to others, even though he may be suffering himself.”

In Colossians 3:12-13 (nasb), Paul says, So, as those who have been chosen of God, holy and beloved, put on a heart of compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience; bearing with one another, and forgiving each other, whoever has a complaint against anyone; just as the Lord forgave you, so also should you. Beyond all these things put on love, which is the perfect bond of unity.

As you can see, these nine character qualities listed in Colossians are the exact opposite of pride. A good question for each of us, therefore is, “Can we stay on a horse or are we too full of ourselves with pride?”

“God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble” (James 4:6, nasb).

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